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Introduction

To understand how to use this SDK it is best to read the following documentation:

  • Server Introduction
    First read the Server Introduction to familiarize yourself with the various concepts.
  • Server API Reference
    This Server SDK wraps the Server API and (amongst other things) exposes the responses of the webservice calls as Java objects. Understanding the Server API will help you understanding these SDK objects as well.
  • This current document will help you understand the global flow when interacting with the Ingenico Direct platform using the Java SDK.

The Java SDK helps you to communicate with the Server API. More specifically, it offers a fluent Java API that provides access to all the functionality of the RESTful Server API. Below, we discuss the following topics in detail.

The source code of the SDK is available on Github . There you can find installation instructions.

The API documentation of the latest version of the SDK is available here . For a specific version, replace "latest" with the actual version.

Initialization of the Java SDK

All Java code snippets presented in the API reference assume you have initialized the Java SDK before using them in your Development Environment. This section details the initialization of the Java SDK.

Initializing is simple, and requires only one key task: use our Factory class to create an instance of ClientInterface, which contains the actual methods to communicate with the Server API.

The Factory needs the following input information to provide you with an initialized ClientInterface

  • A URI to the property file with your connection configuration
  • The secretApiKey and apiKeyId. The secretApiKey is a key that is used to authenticate your API requests, and apiKeyId identifies that key (as you can have multiple active keys). Both of these can be obtained from the Ingenico Direct setting tab in the BackOffice

The property file should contain the following keys:

SDK: Java

direct.api.integrator=<your company name>
direct.api.endpoint.host=api.domain.com
# The properties below are optional and use the given values by default
direct.api.endpoint.scheme=https
direct.api.endpoint.port=-1 direct.api.connectTimeout=10000 #Timeout in milliseconds direct.api.socketTimeout=10000 #Timeout in milliseconds direct.api.maxConnections=10 direct.api.https.protocols=TLSv1.2 direct.api.authorizationType=V1HMAC

See API endpoints for the possible hosts.

If a proxy should be used, the property file should additionally contain the following key(s):

SDK: Java

direct.api.proxy.uri=<URL to the proxy host including leading http:// or https://>
# omit the following two lines if no proxy authentication is required
direct.api.proxy.username=<username for the proxy>
direct.api.proxy.password=<password for the proxy>
                

You can create an instance of ClientInterface using the Factory with this code snippet:

SDK: Java

ClientInterface client = Factory.createClient(propertiesUrl.toURI(), "apiKeyId", "secretApiKey");

This ClientInterface instance offers connection pooling and can be reused for multiple concurrent API calls. Once it is no longer used it should be closed.

ClientInterface implements java.io.Closeable , which allows it to be used in try-with-resources statements.

Connection management

The Java SDK by default uses Apache HttpClient for setting up connections to the RESTful Server API. Although this works out-of-the-box for most, sometimes its connection pool contains connections that no longer work due to the basic limitations of the blocking I/O model. See section 2.5 of Connection management for more information.

Therefore, it is recommended to periodically evict expired HTTP connections. With the SDK, this can be done by periodically (e.g. every 10 seconds) calling method closeExpiredConnections of a ClientInterface object.

Because the Java SDK can be used in a multitude of environments, the SDK cannot spawn a thread itself to perform this periodic call. Instead, you should create a scheduled job that runs at a regular interval that performs this cleanup. How this scheduled job should be created depends on the platform that the SDK is used in. Please refer to your platform documentation for instructions on how to create scheduled jobs.

Client meta information

Optionally, for BI and fraud prevention purposes, you can supply meta information about the client used by the customer. To do so, create a new instance of ClientInterface at the start of the customer's payment process as follows:

SDK: Java
ClientInterface consumerSpecificClient = client.withClientMetaInfo("consumer specific JSON meta info");

This consumer-specific instance will use the same connection pool as the ClientInterface from which it was created. As a result, closing a ClientInterface will close all ClientInterface instances created using the withClientMetaInfo method. There is no need to close these separately.

This closing works both ways. If a Client created using the withClientMetaInfo method is closed this will also close the Client it originated from. This will in turn close all other Client instances created using the withClientMetaInfo method. This can be used if only a Client with client meta info is needed.

Do not use this consumer-specific instance for API calls for other consumers.

Example JSON meta information for a mobile app client:

SDK: Java
X-GCS-ClientMetaInfo: {
    "platformIdentifier": "Android/4.4",
    "appIdentifier": "Example mobile app/1.1",
    "sdkIdentifier": "AndroidClientSDK/v1.2",
    "screenSize": "800x600",
    "deviceBrand": "Samsung",
    "deviceType": "GT9300",
    "ipAddress": "123.123.123.123"
}

Example JSON meta information for the JavaScript SDK running in a browser:

SDK: Java
X-GCS-ClientMetaInfo: {
    "platformIdentifier": "Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.1.1; en-gb; Build/KLP) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Safari/534.30",
    "sdkIdentifier": "JavaScriptClientSDK/v1.2",
    "screenSize": "800x600"
}

Payments

As a merchant, your core interaction with Ingenico Direct typically starts when your customer clicks the checkout button in your application. The payment process usually has the following steps:

  1. Payment Product selection
  2. Setting of available information needed for selected payment product (e.g. amount of the order)
  3. Collection of missing customer information needed for selected payment product (e.g. creditcard number)
  4. Submitting the payment request to the Ingenico Direct platform
  5. Handling the response to the payment request (e.g. payment unsuccessful)

The Ingenico Direct platform offers the following ways of handling this payment process:

  • Use a hosted payment through the Hosted Checkout payment pages.
    In this case, you redirect the customer to our hosted payment pages. For you as a merchant, this is the easiest option as the Ingenico Direct platform can handle payment product selection and is responsible for the collection of sensitive data like a creditcard number. Through our Back Office, you still have a lot of control over the look and feel of the checkout.
  • Use a Server SDK to build a payment flow hosted on your server.
    In this case, you can use the Server SDK to obtain the payment products that are applicable to the payment, to obtain the fields that need to be collected from the customer for a selected payment product, and to submit the payment request itself.

In the next couple of paragraphs, we discuss each of these options in more detail.

Use a hosted payment through the Hosted Payment Page

The high-level flow of a hosted payment is described below, followed by a more detailed look at each of the steps.

  1. At this point, your customer has provided all relevant information regarding the order, e.g. a shopping cart of items and a shipping address.
  2. See the section on initialization. Use Factory to create an instance of ClientInterface if you hadn't done so yet, and set the meta data that you've collected about the client of the customer.
  3. Create a CreateHostedCheckoutRequest body and populate at least its Order. See the relevant section of the full API reference for more details. You can specify an optional returnUrl, which is used to redirect your customer back to your website in step 9.
  4. The create hosted checkout SDK call returns a CreateHostedCheckoutResponse response. Store the hostedCheckoutId and RETURNMAC it contains, as well as any other relevant order information. You will need these when your customer returns from our hosted payment pages, or when the customer fails to return in a reasonable amount of time. This response also contains a partialRedirectURL. You have to concatenate the base URL https://payment. with partialRedirectURL according to the formula https://payment. + partialRedirectURL and perform a redirection of your customer to this URL.
  5. After completing the interactive payment process in the RPP, your customer is redirected back to the url you provided in step 3 as body.getHostedCheckoutSpecificInput().getReturnUrl(). The hostedCheckoutId and RETURNMAC you stored in step 5 are added to this URL as query parameters. Specifying a returnUrl is optional, however. As a result, your customer is only redirected back if you've provided a URL in step 3.
  6. If you cannot identify the customer based on e.g. the HTTP session, you can use the hostedCheckoutId for this purpose. If you do, you must check that the hostedCheckoutId and RETURNMAC from the returnUrl match those that you stored in step 3. Note that the RETURNMAC is used as a shared secret between the Ingenico Direct platform and your system that is specific for this hosted checkout.
  7. Retrieve the results of the customer's interaction with the Ingenico Direct platform.
  8. Check the GetHostedCheckoutResponse response returned in step 13. If response.getStatus() equals PAYMENT_CREATED, then the customer attempted a payment, the details of which can be found in response.getCreatedPaymentOutput(). Depending on the payment product chosen and the status of the payment you can "deliver the goods" immediately, or set up a regular poll of the created payment to wait for the status. Such a poll is done using the SDK call client.merchant("merchantId").payments().getPayment(paymentId), where paymentId is response.getCreatedPaymentOutput().getPayment().getId(). For details on the various payment products and their statuses, see Payment Products.

Additionally, it may be the case that the customer does not return in time (or at all), for example because the browser is closed or because you didn't provide a returnUrl. In this case, you need to retrieve the status of the hosted checkout (step 12 of the image above) before the hosted checkout times out, which happens after 2 hours, and follow step 14 of the image above as well.

Use a Server SDK to build a payment flow hosted on your server

The high-level flow of a payment performed from pages hosted on your server is described below, followed by a more detailed look at each of the steps. First, we describe the flow for payment products that do not require a redirect to a payment method hosted by a third party. Afterwards, the flow for payment methods that require a redirect is described.

  1. At this point, your customer has provided all relevant information regarding the order, e.g. a shopping cart of items and a shipping address.
  2. See the section on initialization. Use Factory to create an instance of ClientInterface if you hadn't done so yet, and set the meta data that you've collected about the client of the customer.
  3. Create GetPaymentProductsParams queryParams and request a list of relevant payment products. See the relevant section of the full API reference for more details.
  4. Show the relevant payment products to the customer such that they can select one.
  5. The customer selects one of the available payment products.
  6. Once the customer has decided which payment product should be used, you request the fields of this payment product. See the relevant section of the full API reference for more details.
  7. Based on the information retrieved in the previous step, you render a form that the customer can use to enter all relevant information for the selected payment product.
  8. The customer submits the form.
  9. Create a CreatePaymentRequest body, populate its Order and other properties depending on the selected payment product, and submit it. See the relevant section of the full API reference for more details. Do not store the information provided by the customer. The paymentProductId can be used to determine whether this payment involves a redirect to a third party. For this flow, we assume that we're dealing with a payment that doesn't require a redirect.
  10. The create payment SDK call returns a CreatePaymentResponse response. The status of the payment is accessible via response.getPayment().getStatus(). Depending on the payment product chosen and the status of the payment you can "deliver the goods" immediately, or set up a regular poll of the created payment to wait for the status. Such a poll is done using the SDK call client.merchant("merchantId").payments().getPayment(paymentId), where paymentId is response.getPayment().getId(). For details on the various payment products and their statuses, see Payment Products.

The high-level flow of a payment performed from pages on your server is a little different if a redirect is involved. We only describe the steps that differ from the flow without a redirect.
server-sdk-flow-redirect.png

  1. We assume that we're dealing with a payment that involves a redirect. As mentioned above, this can be determined using the paymentProductId. Create a CreatePaymentRequest body and populate at least its Order. Additionally, populate its redirectPaymentMethodSpecificInput by providing at least the desired returnUrl. The returnUrl defines the location to which the customer should be redirected after completing the payment process. See the relevant section of the full API reference for more details.
  2. The create payment SDK call returns a CreatePaymentResponse response. For payments involving a redirect, response.getMerchantAction().getRedirectData().getRedirectURL() defines the URL to which the customer should be redirected to complete the payment. You need to store the value of response.getMerchantAction().getRedirectData().getRETURNMAC() because it should be compared with the RETURNMAC returned by the third party at a later stage. Additionally, you need to store the value of response.getPayment().getId(). This paymentId is needed to check the status of the payment after the redirect.
  3. Redirect the customer to the redirectUrl.
  4. After the payment process is completed, your customer is redirected to the returnUrl specified previously. In the flow shown in the figure above we assume that this URL brings the customer back to your server.
  5. Retrieve the RETURNMAC provided by the third party from the returnUrl. You can use the RETURNMAC to identify the customer by comparing it with the one stored previously, and to validate that the customer was redirected to you by our systems.
  6. Use the paymentId stored previously to check the status of the payment. See the relevant section of the full API reference for more details. The retrieve payment SDK call returns a PaymentResponse response. The status of the payment is accessible via response.getPayment().getStatus(). Use this status to handle the order appropriately, as described above.

Idempotent requests

To execute a request as an idempotent request, you can call the same method as for a non-idempotent request, but with an extra CallContext argument with its idempotenceKey property set. This will make sure the SDK will send an X-GCS-Idempotence-Key header with the idempotence key as its value.

If a subsequent request is sent with the same idempotence key, the response will contain an X-GCS-Idempotence-Request-Timestamp header, and the SDK will set the idempotenceRequestTimestamp property of the CallContext argument. If the first request has not finished yet, the RESTful Server API will return a 409 status code. If this occurs, the SDK will throw an IdempotenceException with the original idempotence key and the idempotence request timestamp.
For example:

SDK: Java
CallContext context = new CallContext().withIdempotenceKey(idempotenceKey);
try {
    CreatePaymentResponse response = client.merchants(merchantId).payments()
            .createPayment(request, context);
} catch (IdempotenceException e) {
    // A request with the same idempotenceKey is still in progress, try again after a short pause
    // e.getIdempotenceRequestTimestamp() contains the value of the
    // X-GCS-Idempotence-Request-Timestamp header
} finally {
    Long idempotenceRequestTimestamp = context.getIdempotenceRequestTimestamp();
    // idempotenceRequestTimestamp contains the value of the
    // X-GCS-Idempotence-Request-Timestamp header
    // if idempotenceRequestTimestamp is not null this was not the first request
}
If an idempotence key is sent for a call that does not support idempotence, the RESTful Server API will ignore the key and treat the request as a first request.

Exceptions

Payment exceptions

If a payment attempt is declined by the RESTful Server API, a DeclinedPaymentException is thrown. This exception contains a reference to the payment result which can be inspected to find the reason why the payment attempt was declined. This payment result can also be used to later retrieve the payment attempt again.
For example:

SDK: Java
try {
    CreatePaymentResponse response = client.merchants(merchantId).payments().createPayment(request);
} catch (DeclinedPaymentException e) {
    Payment payment = e.getCreatePaymentResult().getPayment();
    String paymentId = payment.getId();
    String paymentStatus = payment.getStatus();
    System.err.println("Payment " + paymentId + " was declined with status " + paymentStatus);
}

Unlike direct payments, indirect payments like iDeal and PayPal usually will not cause a DeclinedPaymentException to be thrown, but instead will result in a CreatePaymentResponse return value. To determine if the payment was successfully finished, declined or cancelled, you would need to retrieve the payment status and examine its contents, especially the status field. It is recommended to use shared code for handling errors.
For example:

SDK: Java
String paymentId;
try {
    CreatePaymentResponse response = client.merchants(merchantId).payments().createPayment(request);
    paymentId = response.getPayment().getId();
} catch (DeclinedPaymentException e) {
    Payment payment = e.getCreatePaymentResult().getPayment();
    handlePaymentError(payment);
    return;
}
// other code
PaymentResponse payment = client.merchants(merchantId).payments().getPayment(paymentId);
if (isNotSuccessful(payment)) {
    handlePaymentError(payment);
}

Refund exceptions

If a refund attempt is declined by the RESTful Server API, a DeclinedRefundException is thrown. This exception contains a reference to the refund result which can be inspected to find the reason why the refund was declined. This refund result can also be used to later retrieve the refund attempt again.
For example:

SDK: Java
try {
    RefundResponse response = client.merchants(merchantId).payments().refundPayment(paymentId, request);
} catch (DeclinedRefundException e) {
    RefundResult refund = e.getRefundResult();
    String refundId = refund.getId();
    String refundStatus = refund.getStatus();
    System.err.println("Refund " + refundId + " was declined with status " + refundStatus);
}

Other exceptions

Besides the above exceptions, all calls can throw one of the following runtime exceptions:

  • A ValidationException if the request was not correct and couldn't be processed (HTTP status code 400)
  • An AuthorizationException if the request was not allowed (HTTP status code 403)
  • An IdempotenceException if an idempotent request caused a conflict (HTTP status code 409)
  • A ReferenceException if an object was attempted to be referenced that doesn't exist or has been removed, or there was a conflict (HTTP status code 404, 409 or 410)
  • A DirectException if something went wrong on the Ingenico Direct platform. The Ingenico Direct platform was unable to process a message from a downstream partner/acquirer, or the service that you're trying to reach is temporary unavailable (HTTP status code 500, 502 or 503)
  • An ApiException if the RESTful Server API returned any other error

A payment attempt can now be handled as follows:

SDK: Java
try {
    CreatePaymentResponse response = client.merchants(merchantId).payments().createPayment(request);
} catch (DeclinedPaymentException e) {
    Payment payment = e.getCreatePaymentResult().getPayment();
    String paymentId = payment.getId();
    String paymentStatus = payment.getStatus();
    System.err.println("Payment " + paymentId + " was declined with status " + paymentStatus);
} catch (ValidationException e) {
    System.err.println("Input validation error:");
    for (APIError error : e.getErrors()) {
        if (error.getPropertyName() == null) {
            System.err.println("- " + error.getCode() + ": " + error.getMessage());
        } else {
            System.err.println("- " + error.getPropertyName() + ": "
                    + error.getCode() + ": " + error.getMessage());
        }
    }
} catch (AuthorizationException e) {
    System.err.println("Authorization error:");
    for (APIError error : e.getErrors()) {
        System.err.println("- " + error.getCode() + ": " + error.getMessage());
    }
} catch (ReferenceException e) {
    System.err.println("Incorrect object reference:");
    for (APIError error : e.getErrors()) {
        System.err.println("- " + error.getCode() + ": " + error.getMessage());
    }
} catch (DirectException e) {
    System.err.println("Error occurred at Ingenico Direct or a downstream partner/acquirer:");
    for (APIError error : e.getErrors()) {
        System.err.println("- " + error.getCode() + ": " + error.getMessage());
    }
} catch (ApiException e) {
    System.err.println("Ingenico Direct error:");
    for (APIError error : e.getErrors()) {
        System.err.println("- " + error.getCode() + ": " + error.getMessage());
    }
}

Exception overview

The following table is a summary that shows when each of these exceptions will be thrown:

HTTP status code Meaning Description Exception Type
200 Successful Your request was processed correctly N/A
201 Created Your request was processed correctly and a new resource was created.
The URI of this created resource is returned in the Location header of the response.
N/A
204 No Content Your request was processed correctly N/A
various; CreatePaymentResult is present in the response Payment Rejected Your request was rejected either by the Ingenico Direct platform or one of our downstream partners/acquirers. DeclinedPaymentException
various; RefundResult is present in the response Refund Rejected Your request was rejected either by the Ingenico Direct platform or one of our downstream partners/acquirers. DeclinedRefundException
400 Bad Request Your request is not correct and can't be processed. Please correct the mistake and try again. ValidationException
403 Not Authorized You're trying to do something that is not allowed or that you're not authorized to do. AuthorizationException
404 Not Found The object you were trying to access could not be found on the server. ReferenceException
409 Conflict Your idempotent request resulted in a conflict. The first request has not finished yet. IdempotenceException
409 Conflict Your request resulted in a conflict. Either you submitted a duplicate request or you're trying to create something with a duplicate key. ReferenceException
410 Gone The object that you are trying to reach has been removed. ReferenceException
500 Internal Server Error Something went wrong on the Ingenico Direct platform. DirectException
502 Bad Gateway The Ingenico Direct platform was unable to process a message from a downstream partner/acquirer. DirectException
503 Service Unavailable The service that you're trying to reach is temporary unavailable.
Please try again later.
DirectException
other Unexpected error An unexpected error has occurred ApiException

Logging

The Java SDK supports logging of requests, responses and exceptions of the API communication.

In order to start using the logging feature, an implementation of the CommunicatorLogger interface should be provided. The SDK provides two example implementations for logging to System.out (SysOutCommunicatorLogger) and logging to a java.util.logging.Logger (JdkCommunicatorLogger).

Logging can be enabled by calling the enableLogging method on a ClientInterface object, and providing the logger as an argument. The logger can subsequently be disabled by calling the disableLogging method.

When logged messages contain sensitive data, this data is obfuscated.

The following code exemplifies the use of adding a logger:

SDK: Java
ClientInterface client = Factory.createClient(propertiesUrl.toURI(), "apiKeyId", "secretApiKey");

CommunicatorLogger logger = new JdkCommunicatorLogger(Logger.getLogger(...), Level.INFO);
client.enableLogging(logger);
//... Do some calls
client.disableLogging();

Installing SSL certificates

Not all versions of Java support the SSL certificates of the Ingenico Direct platform out-of-the-box. If a CommunicationException wrapped around a javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException is thrown when trying to communicate with the Server API, you must manually install an SSL certificate. Following is the procedure for most Java implementations:

  1. Open the correct API Endpoint in your browser; ignore the 404 error.
  2. Export the root certificate (Trustwave / SecureTrust CA) from your browser to a Base64 encoded X.509 (*.CER) file.
  3. From the command line, go to the /lib/security directory of the JRE to use and execute the following command:
SDK: Java
keytool -import -keystore cacerts -alias securetrustca -file <path to exported certificate>

The default password for OpenJDK and Oracle's JDK and JRE is changeit. For other vendors, please check the vendor's documentation.
When prompted to trust the certificate, type yes and press Enter.

Any "Alias already exists" error can be ignored. This implies that the root certificate entry already exists.
The new certificate will not be automatically picked up by the running JVM. The JVM needs to be restarted.
The cacerts key store is specific to the JRE it was bundled with. Do not copy this file when upgrading the Java version. Instead, the above procedure needs to be followed every time a new Java version is installed.
The aforementioned instructions have been successfully tested on OpenJDK and Oracle's JDK. If there are issues installing SSL certificates, please refer to your Java vendor's documentation.

Advanced use: Connection pooling

A ClientInterface created using the Factory class from a properties file or CommunicatorConfiguration object will use its own connection pool. If multiple clients should share a single connection pool, the Factory class should be used to first create a shared Communicator, then to create ClientInterface instances that use that Communicator:

SDK: Java
Communicator communicator = Factory.createCommunicator(propertiesUrl.toURI(), "apiKeyId", "secretApiKey");
// create one or more clients using the shared communicator
ClientInterface client = Factory.createClient(communicator);

Instead of closing these ClientInterface instances, you should instead close the Communicator when it is no longer needed. This will close all ClientInterface instances that use the Communicator instance.

If instead one of the ClientInterface instances is closed, the Communicator will be closed as well. As a result, all other ClientInterface instances that use the Communicator will also be closed. Attempting to use a closed ClientInterface or Communicator will result in an error.

Just like ClientInterface, Communicator implements java.io.Closeable , and can therefore also be used in try-with-resources statements introduced in Java 7.

Connection management

Just like ClientInterface, Communicator also has method closeExpiredConnections that can be used to evict expired HTTP connections. You can call this method on the Communicator instead of on any of the ClientInterface instances. The effect will be the same.

Advanced use: Customization of the communication

A ClientInterface uses a Communicator to communicate with the RESTful Server API. A Communicator contains all the logic to transform a request object to a HTTP request and a HTTP response to a response object. If needed, you can extend this class. To instantiate a ClientInterface that uses your own implementation of Communicator you can use the following code snippet:

SDK: Java
Communicator communicator = new YourCommunicator();
ClientInterface client = Factory.createClient(communicator);

However, for most customizations you do not have to extend Communicator. The functionality of the DefaultCommunicator is built on classes AuthenticaterConnectionMarshaller and MetaDataProvider, the implementation of which can easily be extended or replaced. Marshaller is used to marshal and unmarshal request and response objects to and from JSON. It is unlikely that you will want to change this module. The other modules are needed to communicate with the Ingenico Direct platform:

  • The RESTful Server API endpoint URI.
  • A Connection, which represents one or more HTTP connections to the Ingenico Direct server.
  • An Authenticator, which is used to sign your requests.
  • A MetaDataProvider, which constructs the header with meta data of your server that is sent in requests for BI and fraud prevention purposes.

For your convenience, the CommunicatorBuilder class is provided to easily replace one or more of these modules. For example, to instantiate a ClientInterface that uses your own implementation of Connection, you can use the following code snippet:

SDK: Java
Connection connection = new YourConnection();
Communicator communicator = Factory.createCommunicatorBuilder(propertiesUrl.toURI(), "apiKeyId", "secretApiKey")
        .withConnection(connection)
        .build();
ClientInterface client = Factory.createClient(communicator);

Connection management

Calling closeExpiredConnections on a ClientInterface or a Communicator object only works if the Connection implements PooledConnection, otherwise these methods do nothing. If you write a custom Connection that uses a pool of HTTP connections, implement PooledConnection instead.

Logging

To facilitate implementing logging in a custom Connection, the SDK provides utility classes RequestLogMessageBuilder and ResponseLogMessageBuilder. These can be used to easily construct request and response messages. For instance:

SDK: Java

// In the below code, logger is the CommunicatorLogger set using enableLogging.
// Note that it may be null if enableLogging is not called.
String requestId = UUID.randomUUID().toString();
RequestLogMessageBuilder requestLogMessageBuilder =
    new RequestLogMessageBuilder(requestId, method, uri);
// add request headers to requestLogMessageBuilder
// if present, set the request body on requestLogMessageBuilder
logger.log(requestLogMessageBuilder.getMessage());
long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
// send the request
long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
long duration = endTime - startTime;
int statusCode = ...;
// note: the duration is optional
ResponseLogMessageBuilder responseLogMessageBuilder =
    new ResponseLogMessageBuilder(requestId, statusCode, duration);
// add response headers to responseLogMessageBuilder
// if present, set the response body on responseLogMessageBuilder
logger.log(responseLogMessageBuilder.getMessage());

Advanced use: Using system properties

Proxy

The SDK provides basic support for HTTP proxies by specifying the proxy in the property file used for initializing the SDK. If this is not sufficient it is also possible to use Java's proxying mechanism instead. Note that java.net.Authenticator is needed for authentication.